Jane collier an essay on the art of ingeniously tormenting

Binding shaken, with cracked spine, but still held together via the spine cords. It is also an advice book, a handbook of anti-etiquette, and an energetic comedy of manners.

At the risk of tormenting those committed to her revival, I would suggest that we now have more than enough editions of this work and a moratorium of perhaps half a century might be in order.

Her friends were a small circle of writers and intellectuals including Henry and Sarah Fielding and Samuel Richardson, all of whom enjoyed her company and encouraged her talent as editors and collaborators.

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Jane Collier

Or rather, if you will only remember to observe my orders, in acting in direct opposition to all that a Swift, an Addison, a Richardson, a Fielding, or any other good ethical writer intended to teach, you may by referring sometimes to these my rules, as helps to your memory become as profound adepts in this art, as.

Jane Collier was born in or around in or near Wiltshire, England.

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting

After her death, Richardson wrote to Sarah Fielding: To wives, she tells them to "Be out of humour when your husband brings company home: In particular, Samuel Richardson and Henry Fielding both had a particular interest in her intelligence and in her writing ability.

There are also some online texts. Fate played a cruel joke by letting her voice fall on deaf ears for two centuries. It will equally answer in all stations; for how many hurt shins, bloody noses, broken heads, if not broken bones, has this sport caused…?

For, can there be a clearer proof … than that it never did, nor ever can, answer any other end? The 12th of Junea Saturday, at Her two brothers found careers in the law and the military, and while she and her sister worked as servants or governesses, Jane spent more time as something of a perpetual houseguest, living off the kindness of her friends and family and never marrying.

Let the vulgar believe this if they will; but I, and my good pupils, understand things better; and, while we can enjoy the high pleasure of Tormenting, it matters not what the objects of our power either feel, think, or believe.

Background[ edit ] InCollier was living with her brother Arthur in London. If your children happen to have but weak understandings, upbraid them with every excellence you see abroad and lament your own hard fate of being plagued with idiots.

If you have needle-work in your hands, you may be so busy in cutting out, and measuring one part with another, that it will plainly appear to your husband, that you mind not one word he reads. In this introduction, the narrator claims: She died inher only other book being The Cry: Otherwise, pages quite clean and crisp.

Many a disappointment has arose, from fixing your choice on a fool; for frequently will you find such a want of affection, such a thorough selfishness, so much cunning and obstinacy, annexed to folly, that all your labour will be thrown away A few pencil marks, page This love of Tormenting may be said to have one thing in common with what … belongs to the true love of virtue namely, that it is exercised for its own sake, and no other: If their chief joy be in endeavouring, by their cheerful conversation to please and amuse you put on such a rigid austerity, as shall make them afraid to open their lips before you; and withhold from them the least appearance of pleasure or good humour in yourself, for their readiness in all things to comply with your will.

Work remains to be done on how much of her history of midwifery or her model for a college derives from male-authored works. Ultimately, though, children lucky enough to be born to people with such enthusiasms are subjected to a long-term initiation—a hazing, really—into this sport, practically from birth.

As a general rule, the narrator says, "By all means avoid an evenness of behaviour.

An Essay On the Art Of Ingeniously Tormenting

Sensitivity, sincerity and benevolence were considered indispensable dispositions for the proper woman of the age. Leather worn and rubbed, with erosion at tips and spine ends.

People like Collier, in fact. It is divided into two sections that are organized for "advice" to specific groups, and it is followed by "General Rules" for all people to follow.

A social satire that was originally published anonymously Millar, in the Strand; London, This is the first edition and the only edition published during the lifetime of Jane Collier A flair for mind games, however subtle or however childish, is always of value to the star student.

And it helps to have a wit as sharp as an ice pick: Victimhood, it seems, is the best household role for a young charity case:Perhaps the first extended non-fiction prose satire written by an English woman, Jane Collier’s An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting () is a wickedly satirical send-up of eighteenth-century advice manuals and educational tracts.5/5(2).

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting. Jane Collier An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting ed. A. Bilger, () it is from suffering, and not from inflicting torments, that the true idea of them is gained (). An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting: With Proper Rules for the Exercise of that Pleasant Art Jane Collier A.

Millar, - Conduct of life - pages.

Jane Collier ( – March )[1] was an English novelist most famous for her book An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting (). She also collaborated with Sarah Fielding on her only other surviving work The Cry ()/5(9).

"Jane Collier's An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting (), a conduct book, was her first work. The Essay operates as a satirical advice book on how to nag and it was modeled after Jonathan Swift's satirical essays.

An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting: With Proper Rules for the Exercise of That Pleasant Art / Edition 1 Perhaps the first extended non-fiction prose satire written by an English woman, Jane Collier’s An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting () is a wickedly satirical send-up of eighteenth-century advice manuals and Price: $

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Jane collier an essay on the art of ingeniously tormenting
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